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T1: How to efficiently publish and locate linked data: Semantic Web Sitemaps and Sindice API

With almost 30 million semantic web sources, the Sindice Semantic Web search engine is the comprehensive API and dataset available today to search the entire Linked Data Semantic Web. We will demonstrate the API, including the new, triple level, features and present simple examples of applications which can be created by interfacing to it. Also, we will illustrate how to craft a “Semantic Sitemap”, a new proposed standard to efficiently large quantities of linked data for reuse by Semantic Web crawlers and clients alike. — Query the Semantic Web of linked data Live from your applications. We’ll show the value of it with high level examples and a demonstration. — To publish Semantic Web data in a way which is both efficient and guarantees maximum precision and recall when harvested by clients or semantic web enabled Search Engines thanks to the Semantic Sitemap Extension.

T2: Starting with SPARQL: making RDF shine

RDF data can be linked across the web. SPARQL is the standard way to query RDF. Through a series of examples, each key feature of the SPARQL language is explained. No RDF theory is required. Starting with a view of RDF as a table of data, this talk will show SPARQL as a simple pattern matching language that can be used to extract information out of RDF. From there, we show how to use SPARQL and inference. The audience will leave with a data centric view of RDF, and an understanding of what SPARQL can be used for.

T3: Best Practice in Semantic Systems Development

This presentation explores the challenges and approaches for effective semantic systems development. We explore the ROI of semantic systems which are primarily based on agility, flexibility, and information quality. While best practices in traditional database-driven systems development life cycle (SDLC) may still be relevant to semantic systems development, there are important differences between them. We elaborate the success factors to consider with examples of different enterprise solutions: ecommerce site, social network analysis, semantic search engine, and risk management. The audience will walk away understanding the critical first steps and on-going management needed to deliver an enterprise semantic system.

T4: Linked Data: The Real Web 2.0

Linking Open Data (LOD) is a community initiative moving the Web from the idea of separated documents to a wide information space of data. The key principles of LOD are that it is simple, readily adaptable by Web developers, and complements many other popular Web trends. Linked, open data is the real substance of Web 2.0, and not flashy AJAX effects. Learn how to make your data more widely used by making its components easier to discover, more valuable, and easier for people to reuse�in ways you might not anticipate.

T9: TripBlox : Shared Travel Information, Microformats, Ideas and Intent

Tripblox is an initiative to use open standards with a travel twist to help publish, promote and aggregate trip ideas. During this presentation, the speakers will discuss the trip publishing standard, the OWL ontology that it feeds and the site created to search them. The speakers will also investigate some of the techniques used to encourage data structure in user submitted content and how they connections between trips, activities, hotels, and trip authors. This session provides a much-needed example of microformats applied to a vertical industry (travel).

T10: The Fellowship of the Web: The Two Towers

There are currently several different approaches to semantics and the Semantic Web floating around. While the uptake of these technologies is going extremely well, there is still confusion about what sort of technology fits where and how it works. The confusion is made worse because the term “ontology” is used in several different ways. In this talk, I will describe how these different sorts of models can be used to link data in different ways. I will particularly explore different kinds of Web applications, from Enterprise Data Integration to Web 3.0 startups, and the different kinds of techniques needed for these different approaches. In addition, some reflections on OWL and the current OWL Working Group are sure to arise.

T11: Semantic Discovery for Enterprises and Consumers using Service Oriented Architectures

Premise: As an increasing number of resources on the web (be they data, people, services, products…media) become semantically accessible. New services that retrieve and match resources with a high degree of relevancy become critically important. Moreover – the ability for such services to act as an agent and match on a continuous basis ensures results are always as current as possible. Agenda: The presentation will cover three applications of Semantic Discovery for the enterprise and the consumer and will outline how to take advantage of SOA / Web Service based frameworks for use within your organization/project. Walk Away: -Concepts of Semantic Discovery and the benefit to business and consumer -How to technically integrate Semantic Discovery services into your business -How to sell through Semantic Discovery services to clients.

T12: Enabling Semantic Applications Through Calais

The promise of the Semantic Web is in shielding the user from the Data Access problem. A necessary condition to fulfill this promise is data and content interoperability. We all want to make all the world’s content more accessible, interoperable and valuable. Whether you call it Web 2.0, Web 3.0 or the semantic Web, Reuters piece of it is called Calais. Reuters’ Calais Web service automates semantic metadata generation, incorporates user-developed metadata, transports metadata throughout the content ecosystem and extends it by allowing users to build new metadata generation capabilities.

X1: Special Event: NY XML SIG Meeting – Semantic Web Glasses Framework

Semantic Web Glasses Framework brings information silos together and enables leveraging wider spectrum of information representations. For example, it can on-the-fly normalize various RSS standards and dialects or translate between TopicMaps, RDF and XML Schemas. We will demonstrate how information expressed in RDF or TopicMaps can be seen as an importable XML Schema, and how RSS Semantic Glasses can help feed readers and aggregators consume various metadata about web resources. Machinery enabling on-the-fly translation and normalization from various XML representations requires just a few lines of Java/C# code. We will present the code and a sample XSLT library.

Semantic Web Glasses Framework

Semantic Web Glasses Framework brings information silos together and enables leveraging wider spectrum of information representations. For example, it can on-the-fly normalize various RSS standards and dialects or translate between TopicMaps, RDF and XML Schemas. We will demonstrate how information expressed in RDF or TopicMaps can be seen as an importable XML Schema, and how RSS Semantic Glasses can help feed readers and aggregators consume various metadata about web resources. Machinery enabling on-the-fly translation and normalization from various XML representations requires just a few lines of Java/C# code. We will present the code and a sample XSLT library.

X2: Special Event: NY XML SIG Meeting – Semantic (not syntactic) tools for versioning and for data integration

Data versioning problems (see e.g. recent xml-dev thread http://lists.xml.org/archives/xml-dev/200712/threads.html#00044 ) have outgrown syntactic (essentially tree-walking diff) solutions. Likewise, there are more and more sophisticated data integration problems where there is no workable syntactic mapping between the domains to be integrated, nor between each of them and some syntactically-described superset–the traditional approach to solving these problems. What seems to be required is a common process to elaborate semantics from the syntactic data of each domain, so that comparisons might then be done on the resulting semantic outcomes, rather than on the underlying raw syntax. Genetic mapping presented a similar problem–variant syntactic sequences yielding similar or congruent semantic outcomes–and the mapping techniques now routinely employed in genetics seem to have direct application to the data management problems of mapping between versions and mapping diverse data domains through the similarities of their semantic outcomes, rather than through their discouragingly disjoint syntax and their non-congruent granularities.

Semantic (not syntactic) tools for versioning and for data integration

Data versioning problems (see e.g. recent xml-dev thread http://lists.xml.org/archives/xml-dev/200712/threads.html#00044 ) have outgrown syntactic (essentially tree-walking diff) solutions. Likewise, there are more and more sophisticated data integration problems where there is no workable syntactic mapping between the domains to be integrated, nor between each of them and some syntactically-described superset–the traditional approach to solving these problems. What seems to be required is a common process to elaborate semantics from the syntactic data of each domain, so that comparisons might then be done on the resulting semantic outcomes, rather than on the underlying raw syntax. Genetic mapping presented a similar problem–variant syntactic sequences yielding similar or congruent semantic outcomes–and the mapping techniques now routinely employed in genetics seem to have direct application to the data management problems of mapping between versions and mapping diverse data domains through the similarities of their semantic outcomes, rather than through their discouragingly disjoint syntax and their non-congruent granularities.

W2: From DBpedia to OntoWiki – Emergent Data and Semantics from Social Collaboration

Large data and knowledge bases are increasingly often created through collaboration within online communities. In the light of the example applications DBpedia and OntoWiki we present technologies enabling and exploiting such emergent semantic representations. DBpedia is a knowledge base containing a structured, semantic representation of data, information and knowledge from Wikipedia. It is the largest linked data base available today and facilitates a variety of application and usage scenarios ranging from intelligent search to novel visualization techniques. OntoWiki is a tool providing support for adaptive, distributed knowledge engineering scenarios. It facilitates the visual presentation of a knowledge base as an information map and enables intuitive authoring of semantic content, with an inline editing mode for editing LinkedData content, similar to WYSIWYG for text documents. It fosters social collaboration aspects by keeping track of changes, allowing to comment and discuss every single part of a knowledge base, enabling to rate and measure the popularity of content and honoring the activity of users. Ontowiki enhances the browsing and retrieval by offering semantic enhanced search strategies. All these techniques are applied with the ultimate goal of decreasing the entrance barrier for projects and domain experts to collaborate using semantic technologies.

W3: Using Machine Learning to Discover and Understand Structured and Unstructured Data

Structure data is ubiquitous on the web, but it is often disguised as semi-structured web sites – i.e., web sites that people can immediately perceive as containing structured data, but computers cannot readily interpret. However, modern machine learning methods can pierce this disguise and extract structured data from the web and otehr sources. Furthermore, the data thus extracted is accurate enough to support many interesting data-mining operations, including structured queries, collaborative recommendation, classification, and set expansion. I will discuss the history and current state-of-the-art of machine learning for data extraction and information integration, and some of the practical implications of this technology.

W9: Leveraging Semantic Technology for Infrastructure Mediation

This technical presentation examines in detail how semantic technology is being applied to optimize Machine-to-Machine Intelligence for large scale distributed computing networks. The session will be of interest to participants wishing to see detailed case study information on how this technology is emerging in the “Application Program Management” and thus infrastructure mediation space. The first way of Semantic technology focussed on Search and Interoperability, with over 5 years experience is developing such solutions, the presenter fuses advanced artificial intelligence with semantic technology – via a live demonstration.

W10: How to Publish Linked Data on the Web

So you want to publish Linked Data on the Web? This session, based on the primary tutorial resource for Linked Data publishers, will tell you how. The talk will outline the principles of Linked Data and highlight issues that must be considered by you as a data publisher. Best practices will be presented in areas such as how to choose good URIs for your resources, which vocabularies to use to describe your data, and how to link your data set to others on the Web. You can expect to leave the session with a broad understanding of the design decisions involved in publishing Linked Data.

W11: The Social Internet, Promise or Plague in Education?

The Social Internet has spawned numerous networks silos with data that is isolated from traditional search mechanisms. How will all of this new data being generated in these silos be accessed? When, if ever, is it appropriate to connect with the data and profiles in these silos? Education is a great arena to explore when thinking about bridging privacy needs with the benefits of data connectivity and collaboration provided by social networking. Can social networking keep students profiles protected, enhance student performance and facilitate professional development with social networking? This talk will cover the benefits of and technology best practices for collaborative educational environments and data connectivity in education.

W12: Semantic Technology in the Real World: Challenges and Opportunities

Moving from a web of linked documents to a web of linked data presents opportunities and challenges. A panel of CEOs and experts will discuss the challenges and opportunities, as well as practical applications of semantic technologies for web and enterprise computing.
MODERATOR: Ken North, President, Ken North Computing LLC

PANELIST: Geoff Brown, CEO, m2mi Corporation

PANELIST: Kingsley Idehen , President and CEO, OpenLink Software Inc.

PANELIST: Dr. Anant Jhingran, VP and CTO, Information Management Division, IBM

PANELIST: Eghosa Omoigui, Director, Strategic Investments, Consumer Internet & Semantic Technologies, Intel Capital

PANELIST: Dave Pearson, Vice President , Oracle

PANELIST: Alex Spinelli, Chief Technical Officer, Reuters News

G3: Catalyst Panel: The View from LinkedData Planet

The catalyst panel discussion brings together thought leaders, technologists and executives. It provides a forum for discussing what hot technologies or business opportunities are attracting investors and for organizations to showcase their technology. It’s also an vehicle for entrepreneurs to draw from their expertise to discuss launching new ventures: planning, finding talent, acquiring venture funding and so on. Panel members will discuss leading-edge technology, current challenges, issues and trends that are driving the technology marketplace.
MODERATOR: John Pallatto, West Coast News Editor, eWEEK

PANELIST: Paul Lipton, Sr. Architect, IP & Standards, CA, Inc.

PANELIST: Eghosa Omoigui, Director, Strategic Investments, Consumer Internet & Semantic Technologies, Intel Capital